Good News from Africa

  1. Malian Nurse helps her city back to health:

Mali’s rampant conflicts have led to thousands fleeing the country in search of safer places. This was the case of Jamilla Amadou, who fled the town of Gao in 2012 when extremist groups occupied the northern city. But she decided to return home after years in exile to use her skills in nursing, to help rebuild her city despite the insecurity. “We care for patients. People come with all kinds of ailments — malaria, diarrhea, typhoid fever, stomach problems, high blood pressure. We see a lot of children, even more than adults. That’s very important. ”The 50-year-old says most of the patients she receives are mainly those displaced by conflict.

  • Nigeria widows get major win in shell case:

The widows of nine Nigerian activists executed in 1995 got a major boost on Wednesday when a Dutch court ruled that it had jurisdiction to determine whether Royal Dutch Shell was complicit in the Nigerian government’s execution of their husbands. The men who came to be known as the Ogoni Nine, were environmental activists who fought against widespread pollution in the Niger Delta. The four widows accuse Shell of instigating a deadly crackdown by the military government of the time against peaceful protesters in Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta, the most valuable oil-producing region in Nigeria.

  • Rwandan cosmetics business booms:

Uburanga or Beauty in English has succeeded in becoming a sought-after brand in the Rwandan cosmetology market. The company has six product lines and 20 employees. Its founder Cephas Nshimyumuremyi, said he started this business with $10.Since 2012, ‘‘Uburanga’‘ has 5,000 distributors across Rwanda. Today, the company’s value is estimated at $40,000.We make sure that the products we manufacture are intended in particular for Africa and that they are natural.

  • Guinea: Train to transport bauxite in service soon:

Guinea’s new railway line will begin the transportation of bauxite by June 2021.The international SMB-Winning consortium responsible for the $3 billion project made the announcement, Friday. The project aims to exploit new bauxite deposits in the Santou and Houda region (250 km north of Conakry), then to transport and process the ore for export, thanks to an alumina refinery to be built in the Boké special economic zone, a city close to the border with Guinea-Bissau. The construction of this 135-kilometre railway will be carried out by two Chinese companies. Guinea derives most of its income from the exploitation of mines such as bauxite, making it the 3rd largest producer in the world. Conakry thus aims to catch up on its infrastructure backlog in order to exploit its rich mining potential, in particular. The international SMB-Winning consortium, composed of Guinean, Singaporean (40%) and Chinese (23%) interests, will operate the railway for 33 years, before returning it to the state, on the basis of a public-private partnership.

  • Bio-Diversity heroes: The teenagers saving Madagascar’s wildlife:

The island nation of Madagascar has a dubious accolade: it is the world-leader in deforestation. Now, some of the island’s teenagers have started a farming revolution – working to stop food production from destroying the island’s rich rainforest. We crouch low – backpacks at our feet – gripping the sides of that canoe as it is expertly steered across the water. We are less than 100 miles from the capital of Madagascar, Antananarivo, but this is a stark reminder of just how remote the communities of this protected area are. When we have crossed the river, it is still a two-hour walk to Mangabe village. We’re going there to meet a group of Malagasy teenagers – young famers who are leading a small but vital revolution – transforming how people farm in order save their forest.

Datum Recruitment Services, is an Executive Search Firm; We specialise in recruiting for Africa and Middle East markets

more about us on www.datum-recruitment.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *